Folium: Ten Food Idioms Explained via Foodbeast.com

Folium: Ten Food Idioms Explained via Foodbeast.com

Folium: Ten Food Idioms Explained via Foodbeast.com

Folium: Ten Food Idioms Explained via Foodbeast.com

When was the last time you “burned the midnight oil” or “threw in the towel”?

How about “throwing out the baby with the bath water”? Who actually throws out their bath water today? And in this age of extreme child safety, I would think that the parents involved would immediately be brought up on negligence charges.

This is the power of metaphor, and another example of the adaptability of the English language. In the English language, there are over 25000 idioms!

Realize it or not, food-related figures of speech have always been a part of our daily conversations — just like that extra serving of veggies that Mom always tried to sneak into lasagna. We all know what it means for something to be “easy as pie” or “chopped liver,” but how many of us really know why pie is “easy” (hey, if it were that easy, why isn’t pie made more often?) or why a minced-up delicacy essentially means that you’re feeling ignored? – Foodbeast

Chew on This!

Chew on This!

Foodbeast posted a good spread of food-related metaphors for us to chew on, and learning the histories of these metaphors can give is some insight into their literal meaning, and how their use still shapes our perceptions today.

I’m always amazed how I can use the simplest metaphors to express the most complex ideas. In just one sentence you can tell an entire story, communicate the result of that story, and through common cultural connections reach mutual understanding immediately. So quick, yet so deep at the same time!

It’s a great article, go check it out!

Have you ever used any of these metaphors before? Recently?

Have you ever thought about the true meaning of what you’re saying, and how it affects the impact of your message?

Have you discovered any new metaphors, ones that have come into use in the past few years?

Resources:


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